Monday, 26 January 2015

The Hindutva Legacy of Netaji

By : Animitra Chakroborty. 

The revolutionary leader Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose always referred to Vedanta and the Bhagavad-Gita as sources of inspiration for the struggle against the British. Swami Vivekananda’s teachings on universalism, his nationalist thoughts and his emphasis on social service and reform had all inspired Subhas Chandra Bose from his very young days.
The fresh interpretation of the India’s ancient scriptures appealed immensely to Subhas Hindu spirituality formed the essential part of his political and social thought through his adult life, although there was no sense of bigotry or orthodoxy in it. Subhas who called himself a socialist, believed that socialism in India owed its origins to Swami Vivekananda. As historian Leonard Gordan explains “Inner religious explorations continued to be a part of his adult life. This set him apart from the slowly growing number of atheistic socialists and communists who dotted the Indian landscape.” “Hinduism was an essential part of his Indianess”. His strategy against the British also included the use of Hindu symbols and festivals. In 1925, while in Mandalay jail, he went on a hunger strike when Durga puja was not supported by prison authorities.
As a perfect son of the fiery era of freedom movement, Subhas, from his tender age had a great devotion to Dharma and was found to meditate for hours too. Devotion to Hindu Dharma in him was so high that once asceticism appeared to him as the best way. But after lots of failed efforts and disappointments he found solace in the literature of Swami Vivekananda; he considered Swami as his own Guru.
In his Taruner Swapna (a book in Bengali as a ‘Dream of a Young Boy’), Subhas reflected his true vision in the line of Worship of Mother land as outlined in ‘Ananda Math’. This line of worship of Motherland is envisaged in writings and thinking of Rishi Bankimchandra, Swami Vivekananda and Sri Aurovinda in a same manner.
Subhas was considered as the ideal convergence of Bhakti (devotion)  and Shakti (Strength) by his comrades even. It is quite amazing to note that even in his tiring times, be it the formation of Bengal Volunteers during the 1928 Kolkata session of Indian National Congress or his election as the president of Indian National Congress or his expulsion from the same party, he used to go through Srimad Bhagavad Gita and other Hindu religious books on a daily basis. Numerous citations can be quoted to prove the same.
Netaji was grosslyinfluenced by VD Savarkar, renowned theoretician and leader of All India Hindu Mahasabha, to change the track of his actions. As per Savarkar, Bose was wasting time in agitating for removal of Holwell Monument in then Calcutta and so he was advised to wage the war of national liberation from outside of India. Surely this historical advice changed Bose’s life on the whole.
Exponents of alleged secularism in India can be silenced by the fact that Netaji had high regards for Savarkar and also recognized his role. In his speech on Azad Hind Radio (June 25, 1944) he admitted Savarkar’s wisdom through these words: “When due to misguided political whims and lack of vision, almost all the leaders of Congress party have been decrying all the soldiers in Indian Army as mercenaries, it is heartening to know that Veer Savarkar is fearlessly exhorting the youths of India to enlist in armed forces. These enlisted youths themselves provide us with trained men and soldiers for our Indian National Army.”
Testaments also prove even when Indian National Army (Azad Hind Fauj) was engaged in life and death struggle Netaji used to read Srimad Bhagavad Gita, Sri Sri Chandi and perform Puja daily.
Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose is indeed the most perfect Karma Yogi and an ardent follower of Hindutva without any duplicity or the fake shield of Secularism.
Compilation:  Upananda Brahmachari.    Source: Hinduexistence

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